Content is King. No, Context is King. Which is it?

Content is king. Context is king

There’s a debate raging in the blogosphere amongst marketers.  On one side are the content advocates.  They suggest content is king, because the internet is driven by content.  On the other side are the context advocates.  They say content is nothing without perspective and purpose, therefore context must be king.

The debate is interesting, but it’s meaningless.  Both are essential.

Content is a given

Without content, you won’t have a presence on the web.  Everything online is driven by content, whether it’s websites, blogs, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, you name it.  Content is the life blood that creates a digital footprint.

Wouldn’t it be strange if you Googled a company, and nothing came up.  What would that say?  Basically, it would say you, the user, made a mistake in your search.  A company without content doesn’t exist online.  And if it doesn’t exist online, than internet logic says the company probably doesn’t exist in the real world either.  A company’s credibility is very much anchored in their web presence.

Companies have to commit to producing content regularly.  Choose a platform, commit to it, actively participate and produce content.  Post videos, twitter, write articles, whatever.  If you don’t produce content, your company won’t exist.

Context is your strategy

Without context, your content is meaningless.

Content without context litters the web.  You come across it in your daily searches where the heading looks interesting, but the results are anything but.  The endless “top 10” lists are perfect examples of this weak content.

Google Analytics has a measure for content without context.  It’s the Bounce Rate.  A high bounce rate is a pretty good sign that the content needs context.

Context is strategy.  Does your content have a purpose?  Is it intended for a specific audience?  Does it bring value to that audience?  Does it share a point of view, or an interesting perspective?  These are important questions.  The more relevant your content is for a targeted audience the better.  That’s what makes content sticky.  That’s what makes it relevant.  That’s what makes it interesting.

Take the Challenge

I am a firm believer in content marketing.  That’s how you bring value to your market, engage it early and often, and be your customers’ first call when they are ready to buy.  But don’t forget the context to your content.  You won’t be your customers’ first call, unless you engage them with something of value and get them to consider your company as a credible answer for their needs.